The Lost Pubs of Bath

by Andrew Swift & Kirsten Elliott

PLEASE NOTE: THIS BOOK IS NOW OUT OF PRINT. SOME BOOKSHOPS IN BATH MAY STILL HAVE COPIES BUT WE ARE UNABLE TO SUPPLY IT.

The triumphant conclusion to the Bath Pubs trilogy is a celebration of Bath’s lost pubs. Join such luminaries as Dr Johnson, Charles Dickens and Jane Austen, along with a motley array of coachmen, policemen, harlots, vagabonds and ne’er-do-wells, as they wander from grand coaching inn to humble alehouse, from refined pleasure garden to squalid knocking shop. The one thing all their ports of call have in common is that, in every case, last orders have been called for ever.
With over 500 lost pubs and 500 illustrations, The Lost Pubs of Bath is essential reading for anyone interested in one of England’s most memorable cities. Once you’ve read it, you’ll never look at Bath in the same way again.

“This book, while weighty in your hand, reads as a light hearted and loving history … The text flows in narrative form and can be used as a walking guide to the sites described. But throughout the authors never get too serious, even suggesting that one use of their work is to help support a table with one extremely short leg. What is clear is their passion for the Bath pubs scene, both past and present. Their objective is to record all of Bath’s pubs since 1776 – or before if records allow. They seem to have achieved it.”
Brewery History Society Journal

“Wandering the streets of the city with the new book The Lost Pubs of Bath, familiar places were bathed in a fascinating new light. Pulteney Street, Argyle Street and Grove Street were no longer filled with 21st century shoppers heading home from the sales, but the ghosts of the past. The book features some larger than life characters and intriguing tales. Like the other volumes in the Bath Pubs trilogy, the painstaking research and attention to detail shines through as the authors hunt down more than 500 alehouses where time has been called forever. The nostalgia trip can be enjoyed by armchair reader and pavement walker alike. A series of nine walk routes are outlined so you can step out and make then-and-now comparisons with the fascinating old photographs. Or just read the tales and revisit the familiar places in your mind.”
Bob Jenkins, Bath Chronicle